Tag Archives: #WomenCelebrateWednesday

#WednesdayCelebrateWomen: Nunu Namises advocates for Goal 17 Partnerships for the Goals

The adoption of  the Sustainable Development Goals marked a tremendous shift for the post 2015 development agenda. 17 “Global Goals”   to charter new frontiers with regard to reaching 169 targets covering a broad range of development issues some of which include ending poverty in all its forms everywhere, ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition, promoting sustainable agriculture as well as ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages.

 

As part of the #WednesdayCelebrateWomen campaign 2017, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) asks the #WCW feature to pick an SDG which resonates with them most and why. UNIC also asks how the #WCW plan to work towards achieving that particular goal.

UNIC’s dynamic feature, Nesindano Namises (Nunu) writer, poet, singer, mother and #WednesdayCelebrateWomen for the month of April chose goal 17, “Partnerships for the Goals.”

This goal states that a successful sustainable development agenda requires partnerships between governments, the private sector and civil society. These inclusive partnerships built upon principles and values, a shared vision, and shared goals that place people and the planet at the centre, are needed at the global, regional, national and local level. Nunu believes that “anything that involves our collective growth as a people should be considered a collaborative effort. Continue reading

#WednesdayCelebrateWomen: UNIC Windhoek celebrates mother and dedicated student Natalie Kamati

natalie-wcwIn order to promote women’s empowerment and to generate awareness of the importance of gender equality, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Windhoek celebrates women and their accomplishments each Wednesday.

For this week’s #WCW #WednesdayCelebrateWomen, UNIC Windhoek celebrates Natalie Kamati, a dedicated student who has embraced being a teenage mother.

Check out Natalie’s interview with UNIC Windhoek! Read along as she talks about how she has grown from the challenges she has faced as a teenage mother, her career goals and women’s empowerment.

1.) Could you tell us a bit about yourself?

I am a normal teenager currently in high school and aspire to pursue a career once I finish school. I regard myself as easy going however as most teens I am guilty of sometimes thinking I know all answers. Life has taught me to be humble and being the only girl among boys has taught me to be assertive. I am often told I have a big heart, and I am always willing to help.

2.) What are your thoughts on women’s empowerment, and why it is important?

I have been blessed to be in a family with very strong women. My grandmother raised 6 children by herself and all her children managed to get an education. Additionally, I was raised by my mother.

The women in my family taught me the importance of working hard and standing on your own two feet. Especially in Namibia where passion killings are constantly on the rise. I think it is important to teach girls to work hard and not rely on sugar daddies making them vulnerable to passion killings. It is important we empower our fellow women in accordance with the Harambee Prosperity Plan.

3.) Could you tell us about your experience being a teenage mother? Have you faced any challenges? What has been the best part of being a mother?

It was by far one of the hardest challenges I had to face in life. Coming from a strong Christian family emotions range from shame to excitement and regret. However my son has been such a blessing. Being a teenager with no financial means or the maturity to raise my son I have to thank my parents for being a strong support system and being there every step of the way. My son is motivating me to work harder, finish school and pursue a college degree in order to give him a better life. I constantly remind myself that no matter what people say and fingers pointed at me, he is my silver lining and not my end or downfall. Life of a teenage mother is filled with constant challenges but I am forever grateful for my Heavenly Father for strengthening me through the challenges and giving me a very supportive family.                                  

4.) How do you balance between being a young mom and attending school?

I would be the first to admit that finding the right balance is a daily challenge. I have support from my mother. She encourages me to work hard at school so that I have a shot at a great future. My son stays with a nanny during school hours and after hours I spend time with him. My mom usually takes care of him in the evening to give me a chance to do homework or study for exams. It is a constant juggling act especially when he is sick.

5.) After you finish with secondary school, what do you plan to do next?

As a teenage mother, having my son has encouraged me to work harder in order for me to provide him with a better future. I foresee a career as a social worker or a psychologist in order to help teenage girls and the elderly.

6.) What is your advice to teenage mothers?

I know as a teenage mother we always think we know and have all the answers. I want to encourage all the young people to listen to your parents and value their advice. I pray to God that pregnancy does not happen to other young girls, for those that did, I pray that they get the love and support that I got from my family. Our parents’ advice is best no matter the challenges, it will be hard, but we will make it. Remember you are the creator of your own destiny our first lady is a perfect example.

7.) Who is your mentor/role model and why?

My role model is my mother. Seeing her work really hard and getting up every day just to make sure her children are happy and have what they need, makes me proud to have her as my mother and she inspires me to want to do many great things. May I add that she’s still pursuing her studies at her age (just completed her Honours degree). Now that is the type of encouragement a teenage mother needs.

8.) What is your wish for young girls in Namibia?

Namibia as a democratic country provide us with many opportunities which we can pursue for our own success as the sky is the limit. I want to encourage young girls not to get encouraged by temporary flashy stuff but to empower ourselves to become strong woman. We hear about passion killing and gender based violence, we should stand strong and soar in order to contribute to woman empowerment in the country. Their circumstances should not compel them into becoming what they are not destined to be, they can make it if they want to, BUT, there are no short cuts in this life, work hard and always put God first. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

#WednesdayCelebrateWomen: UNIC Windhoek celebrates social entrepreneur Ndahafa Hapulile

ndahafa-wcwIn order to promote women’s empowerment and to generate awareness of the importance of gender equality, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Windhoek celebrates women and their accomplishments each Wednesday.

 For this week’s #WCW #WednesdayCelebrateWomen, UNIC Windhoek celebrates Ndahafa Hapulile, an advocate for gender equality who received recognition as an Emerging Entrepreneur at the Namibian Business Hall of Fame induction.

Ndahafa is currently employed as an Assistant to the Secretary General of the SWAPO Party. Additionally, she is an elected board member of the National Youth Council (NYC) of Namibia, chairing the Programme Oversight Committee.

She says, “As a social entrepreneur, I act as a change agent in my community by coming up with innovative ideas to improve systems and invent new approaches, with the hope of creating solutions to change society for the better.”

Check out Ndahafa’s interview with UNIC Windhoek! Read along as she talks about the career challenges she has faced due to her gender. Similarly, see her views on gender equality.

1.) Have you come across any challenges in your field because of your gender?

In every field, there are challenges. However, one of the more notable challenges I have experienced is [dealing with] the stereotypes associated with femininity [specifically when being ‘ladylike’ or ‘looking girly’].

In my field, I have noticed that women who look feminine tend to be thought of as “less brainy”. Beauty is seen as a form of weakness and vulnerability. Many women tone down their femininity to look and act more masculine in order to fit in.

However, as an advocate for gender equality [with experience in the] mining environment as a Metallurgist in training, I am determined to fight these stereotypes and draw inspiration from women like Hon. Dr. Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila and Rosalia Martins-Hausiku who maintained their ‘ladylikeness’ and still made wonderful strides in their respective fields. Continue reading

#WednesdayCelebrateWomen: UNIC Windhoek celebrates UN Cares Programme Coordinator Raturua Tjindere

raturua-wcw-updatedIn order to promote women’s empowerment and to generate awareness of the importance of gender equality, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Windhoek celebrates women and their accomplishments each Wednesday. For this week’s #WCW #WednesdayCelebrateWomen, UNIC Windhoek celebrates Raturua Tjindere, a UN National Volunteer and UN Cares Programme Coordinator.

Raturua was born and raised in Namibia along with her five siblings. She says that her parents are her biggest motivation in life. “I am a humble and strong person today because of my wonderful mother,” she says.

After attending secondary school at Jan Mohr in Windhoek, Raturua studied at the University of Namibia (UNAM) and graduated with a Diploma in Local Government Studies.

She then started her first job as a credit controller, and she says, “I didn’t know that God had better and bigger plans for my life.”

In 2015, she applied and was selected for a youth volunteer post as a Program Assistant with United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). From there, she sought out United Nations Volunteers and was hired to the position where she finds herself today, as a UN National Volunteer and UN Cares Programme Coordinator.

Besides working with the UN System in Namibia, Raturua also currently studies at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) doing a degree in Public Management.

Check out Raturua’s interview with UNIC Windhoek! Read along as she talks about stigma and discrimination in the workplace, women’s empowerment and gender equality. Continue reading

#WednesdayCelebrateWomen: UNIC Windhoek celebrates Lesley-Anne van Wyk

lesley-anne-wcwEach Wednesday, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Windhoek celebrates women and their accomplishments.  Through her work for the Hanns Seidel Foundation Namibia she is instrumental in coordinating  environmental awareness and climate change projects in Namibia. This week we celebrate, Lesley-Anne Van Wyk.

Check out Lesley-Anne’s interview with UNIC Windhoek! Read along as she talks about climate change and the tips she gives on combating climate change. See what she reckons on gender equality.

 1.) Could you tell us a bit about yourself and your career?

My name is Lesley-Anne van Wyk and I was born and raised in Windhoek. I hold a Bachelors degree in Languages and Journalism from the University of Pretoria and a Masters degree in Globalisation and Development Studies from the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands. I have over 9 years of work experience in diverse roles and dynamic organisations. The last 5 years of my career have been focused in the spheres of environmental sustainability, climate change adaptation, food security and development communications. Currently, I coordinate an environmental awareness and climate change project at the Namibian office of an international foundation.

2.) What is climate change? How is climate change impacting Namibia?

Climate change, in simple terms, can be defined as changes in the average long-term weather patterns of a region for an extended period of time, typically decades or longer. Examples include shifts in wind patterns, the average temperature, or the amount of precipitation. These changes can affect one region, many regions or the whole planet. The Earth’s climate has never been completely static and in the past the planet’s climate has changed due to natural causes (e.g. volcanic eruptions, changes in the sun’s intensity). These effects are spread out around the globe mainly by ocean currents as well as wind and weather patterns to affect the climates of different regions. Human activities like the burning of fossil fuels or industrial production increase the levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This traps more heat in our atmosphere, which drives global warming and climate change.

Namibia is particularly vulnerable because it already has a dry and highly variable climate. The vast majority of the population depends on natural resources for their livelihoods. The population growth of Namibia is expected to put additional pressure on (especially) land and water resources. Poverty, lack of income and lack of employment opportunities increase the vulnerability of households to cope with the impacts of climate change e.g. the shocks of extreme weather events such as droughts and floods.  Continue reading

#WednesdayCelebrateWomen: UNIC Windhoek celebrates educator Petra Wojcik

petra-wcwEach Wednesday, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Windhoek celebrates women and their accomplishments through its #WednesdayCelebrateWomen #WCW social media campaign. This Wednesday, UNIC Windhoek celebrates educator Petra Wojcik.

Petra has been a teacher for eight years. After teaching in Germany, she came to Namibia in January 2015 and started at Deutsche Höhere Privatschule Windhoek (DHPS) where she teaches foreign language and social studies (politics).

From travelling the world and living in various countries, Petra gained valuable experiences and knowledge, which she applies to and incorporates into her teaching.

When she was 16 years old, her parents sent her to attend one year of high school in Melbourne, Australia where she learned about Australian culture and improved her English. Later during her studies at Bremen University in Germany, she went to England to study English intensively for half a year. These experiences formed her into the educator she is today.

Her international experience also prepared her to be the coordinator for Model United Nations Namibia (MUNNAM) at DHPS, where she actively facilitates meaningful debates on pressing world issues for the students.

Check out Petra’s interview with UNIC Windhoek. Read along as she discusses the importance of quality education, explains how MUN promotes gender equality and encourages girls to live their dreams. Continue reading

#WCW: UNIC Windhoek celebrates MUNNAM 2012 Best Overall Speaker, Eulalia Joseph

Eulalia Joseph- WCW QuoteEach Wednesday, the United Nations Information Centre (Windhoek) celebrates women through its #WednesdayCelebrateWomen social media campaign. With the two-day Model United Nations Namibia (MUNNAM) 2016 Conference starting Wednesday 8 June, this week UNIC Windhoek celebrates Eulalia Joseph, the recipient of the Best Overall Speaker award at the 1st MUNNAM Conference in 2012.

Meet Eulalia Joseph, as she reflects on her journey…

Hi, I’m Eulalia, a 21 year old aspiring charted accountant at the University of Cape Town. My life presents a different challenge everyday and with that comes the opportunity to defy all odds and rise to the end of every day. I’m made of dreams and determination, and I’m driven by the desire to own an empire. In my free time you are likely to find me at the university’s debating union or indulging in photography. I took time in high school to find where my passions lie by partaking in everything from basketball to chess to drumming but I ended up enjoying and committing to  the Model United Nations club at St. Paul’s College, Windhoek. I continue to participate in Model United Nations conferences offered at university level which is testament to the fact that once, a MUNer always a MUNer.

1.) Why did you choose participate in the Model UN programme when you were at high school?

It was a new initiative, and I knew very little about the United Nations, so naturally I was attracted to the challenge. Additionally, as an orator I was drawn to the idea of being able to speak about the issues that profoundly affect people all over the world.

2.) You were selected as Best Overall Speaker during 2012 MUNNAM conference, what did this mean to you?

More than feeling honoured and being happy, to this day the award is a symbol of a young girl becoming fully cognizant of her own potential. Continue reading

#WCW: UNIC Windhoek celebrates veteran journalist, Francoise Steynberg, a passionate reporter with a heart for the environment

francoise wcw twitterEach Wednesday, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Windhoek celebrates women and their accomplishments. In light of the “International Day for Biological Diversity” which was commemorated on 22 May and raises awareness on the impact human development has had on wildlife, #WCW commemorates a journalist who has worked closely with the Rhino population in Namibia.

This Wednesday, UNIC Windhoek celebrates Francoise Steynberg, a veteran journalist with a heart for nature. Read  the interview UNIC Windhoek had with Francoise below, and learn more about her exciting career journey!

1.) Could you tell us about your career?

I have been a newspaper journalist for 22 years. I started my newspaper career at Rustenburg Herald in South Africa and was promoted after a month to editor of a regional paper, Brits Post. It was very challenging, because I was very young. After two years, I went backpacking in Europe, where after I moved back to Namibia and joined the daily Afrikaans newspaper Republikein.

I moved to Stellenbosch in South Africa where I worked as a communications officer for Capitec Bank, the fastest growing bank in South Africa, running two in-house newsletters. I got fed up with corporate life and decided to travel and work at the same time. I started working as an English teacher in Taiwan and travelled extensively in Asia for six years. I still wrote free-lance for travel magazines in Taiwan and was a correspondent for a radio station in South Africa. In 2009 I finally returned to Namibia and joined Republikein again, where I am now a chief reporter.

2.) Why did you choose to go into media / choose to work as an environmental journalist?

I love languages, reading and writing. I am addicted to following the news and I love the smell of freshly printed newspapers and books. I was always an all-rounder in my journalistic career and I can do any beat (except financial reporting). As a child I was lucky to grow up on a farm in Namibia and I love animals and nature. This played an important role in how I ended up being an environmental journalist.  Continue reading