Tag Archives: UNFPA

UN Namibia dedicates 67 minutes for Mandela Day

The UN System staff members in Namibia dedicated 67 minutes of their time to the service of humanity in light of the international observance to celebrate Nelson  Mandela. The event, which is commemorated annually on 18 July, calls on the global community to make the world a better place. In the spirit of Nelson Mandela, who devoted 67 years of his life to the public service, individuals are challenged to celebrate his legacy by dedicating 67 minutes of their time to service.

On Tuesday 18 July, the UN System in Namibia came together to help members in the local community.  The UN family delivered as ‘One’  and donated food, clothes and blankets to the Family of Hope Services, a local charity organization. Furthermore, UN Agencies reached out to schools and charity organizations to read, serve lunch and play games with children.

WHO, FAO and UNESCO  staff donated canned food items, while UNIC, UNAIDS, IOM and WFP staff purchased fleece blankets and clothing. The collected items were donated to the Family of Hope Services, which provides education, food and clothing to underprivileged children.The Family of Hope Services was founded in 2003 by Abigail Bachopi and has served orphaned and vulnerable children for over 14 years. With the assistance of 30 volunteers, the organization attends to over 450 children, aiming to restore their hope, joy and dignity through empowering and capacity building programs.

Several agencies spent the day reaching out to organizations in Katutura. The staff of UNICEF visited the Jonas Haiduwa Early Childhood Development (ECD) Centre where they read stories and spent time with the children. The organization serves the needs of 97 children aged 3-6. The centre is jointly run by the City of Windhoek and the Ministry of Education, Arts and Culture, and is responsible for educating young children.

UNIC Windhoek staff  teamed up with St. George’s Diocesan School to visit the Tilovayeni Care Foundation, a local soup kitchen and day care centre that serves over 70 children a day. The team and the students delivered a short presentation about Mandela Day, played games with the children and donated food items.

                                                                                                                                                                          UNFPA donated food items to a dedicated family who need support for their 11 children, while UNDP staff members spent the afternoon at the Hope Initiative Centre in one of Katutura’s informal settlements. The team, led by the Resident Coordinator Ms. Kiki Gbeho, relieved the staff at the centre by serving lunch to over 200 children.

By honouring Mandela’s legacy to public service, The UN Family recognizes the importance of making a considerable difference in the lives of the less privileged. The first step to achieving this goal is enabling members of the community to have access to basic needs; to brighten the lives of youth by inspiring them and by making a positive impact in the world.

The United Nations System in Namibia continually strives to implement the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) to move Namibia forward towards the 2030 Agenda. By implementing the vision of Mandela, the UN targeted goal 2, “Zero hunger”, goal 3, “Good health and well-being”, goal 4, “Quality education” and goal 17, “Partnerships for the Goals”.

 

Prosperous Paths: UNFPA Namibia Representative Dennia Gayle addresses teenage pregnancy with Rocky Crest High School learners

rocky crest high school: prosperous pathsWednesday morning was an exciting morning for the Rocky Crest High School female learners, as they had the opportunity to engage with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Representative to Namibia Ms. Dennia Gayle through the UN System in Namibia’s ‘Prosperous Paths’ outreach programme.

After a brief introduction by the National Information Officer to Namibia, Ms. Anthea Basson, Ms. Gayle asked the girls to share their thoughts on women’s empowerment, as she emphasized that the minds of young people produce some of the best ideas.

Answering the question ‘why is it important to invest in teenage girls?’, Ms. Gayle reminded the learners that although teenage girls around the world face more and greater challenges than their male counterparts, it does not mean that the boy child is not affected but rather the depth of the challenges faced by the girls is higher than that of boys. Continue reading

UNFPA’s Executive Director Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin’s Message on World Population Day 2014

UNFPA EXEC DirectToday’s 1.8 billion young people are a powerful force, individually and collectively. They are shaping social and economic realities, challenging norms and values and building the foundation of the world’s future.

Governments and the international community are increasingly conscious of the importance of providing resources and opportunities for all young people to reach their full potential as individuals and citizens. They recognize that investing in young people and enabling them to exercise their human rights not only benefits young people themselves, but can also help their countries reap a demographic dividend.

We know that healthy, educated, productive and fully engaged young people can help break the cycle of intergenerational poverty and are more resilient in the face of individual and societal challenges. As skilled and informed citizens, they can contribute more fully to their communities and nations.

For millions of young people around the world, puberty the biological onset of adolescence brings not only changes to their bodies, but also new vulnerabilities to human rights abuses, particularly in the areas of sexuality, marriage and childbearing. Millions of girls are coerced into unwanted sex or marriage, increasing the risks of unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, as well as death or disability due to childbirth.

This is why young people, especially adolescent girls, are at the heart of our work at UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund. Working with a multitude of partners, in particular young people themselves, UNFPA is advocating policies and programmes that invest in adolescents and youth and foster a positive environment for them; promoting their access to comprehensive sexuality education as well as quality sexual and reproductive health services, including family planning; and facilitating their leadership and participation. We are doing this with an emphasis on reaching the poorest, most marginalized and underserved adolescent girls.

Through this multipronged effort, we and our partners are seeing how critical early investments in sexual and reproductive health can enhance the lives of young people and the welfare of their societies. A sustainable future depends on having resilient populations, which cannot be achieved without investments in young people. They not only form a large proportion of the world’s population and deserve their fair share as a matter of equity, but are also in a critical stage of their lifecycle that will determine their future – and thus those of their families, communities, and societies.

On this World Population Day, I commit UNFPA’s full support to all efforts to promote young people’s aspirations and to place young people at the very heart of national and global development efforts.