Graduate Internship programme: Meet the interns

UNIC Windhoek through its graduate internship placement programme hosts national and international interns for a minimum period of 3 months up to 6 months. During the internship, interns are exposed to the work of the UN Namibia and work along side UNIC Windhoek staff to implement programmes and campaigns. Meet one of our talented Namibian interns currently working at the Centre, Gina Gowases.

 

Regional office visits UNIC Windhoek 9-11 April

Masimba Tafirenyika, Director of the United Nations Information Centre Pretoria was on official visit to the UNIC Windhoek Centre in Namibia. During his visit from 9-11 April 2018 he met with the United Nations Country Team in Namibia ( representing all the agencies in Namibia), the UN Resident Coordinator, Kiki Gbeho, the United Nations Communications Group as well as stakeholders and partners of the UNIC Windhoek office.

UNIC Pretoria holds regional responsibilities to assist other UNICs in sub-Saharan Africa. With South Africa’s well developed infrastructure, large national and international media presence, relatively well resourced government departments, established academia, active civil society and an extensive diplomatic corps. Pretoria is thus a logical choice for such a regional hub. The office lends substantive support to other UNICs on thematic and logistical issues, as well as, where necessary, policy guidance and information outreach assistance. Continue reading

#WCW WednesdayCelebrateWomen: Meet Lucinda Ockhuizen

United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Windhoek honours women through the #WednesdayCelebrateWomen campaign. Throughout the campaign we will meet some of the inspiring women who are making an impact in their communities and find out how they bring about change.To kick start our campaign for 2018, we meet Lucinda Ockhuizen, co-founder, Gadget Boy 3D Solution.

  1. Who is Lucinda Ockhuizen?

I am an educator and a fortuitous social entrepreneur. I am also a daughter, sister, devoted wife and a mother to a 6 year-old boy. I grew up in a small town, in an entrepreneurial household. My mother was a seamstress, and a baker, and my father owned an auto-repair shop. The knowledge and experience I gained growing up in this environment would eventually be invaluable in starting my own business.

I completed a BSc degree in Human Life Sciences, a postgraduate Honours degree in Psychology, and a postgraduate certificate in Education at Stellenbosch University. Following my studies, I first worked as a high school teacher, teaching Sciences, Mathematics, Computer studies, and Life Orientation. I am currently self-employed as an Educational Consultant/Educator, with specific interest and expertise in STEM project-based learning, as well as providing learning support for learners with learning difficulties. In 2015, I became a Founding Partner, Chief Operating Officer, and the Director of Education, Research and Development at GadgetBoy 3D Solutions.

My ambition is to educate more women and children on emerging technological developments, to develop and implement solutions related to socio-cultural and environmental issues.

 Read more next week about being a Namibian woman in 3D technology…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Day of Sport for Development, 6 April 2018

Did you know? The world commemorates the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace (IDSDP) on 6 April each year?

On this day, citizens of the world are encouraged to learn, innovate and promote the ways that sport can help countries, communities and individuals to live, peaceful, prosperous lives.

SG’s Message on World Autism Day

On World Autism Awareness Day, we stand up for the rights of people with autism and speak out against discrimination.

This year’s observance highlights the importance of empowering women and girls with autism.

They face multiple challenges including barriers to accessing education and employment on an equal footing with others, denial of their reproductive rights and the freedom to make their own choices, and a lack of involvement in policy making on matters that concern them.

Our work for gender equality and women’s empowerment must reach all the world’s women and girls. And our efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals must uphold the 2030 Agenda’s core promise to leave no one behind.

On World Autism Awareness Day, let us reaffirm our commitment to promote the full participation of all people with autism, and ensure they have the necessary support to be able to exercise their rights and fundamental freedoms.

#SlowDown: Easter Weekend campaign

Safe travels to all Namibians🇳🇦 traveling over the long weekend. #GlobalGoals #SDG3

Did you know SDG 3,”Ensure healthy lives and promote well being for all at all ages “ targets to halve the number of global deaths & injuries from road traffic accidents. #SlowDown and keep safe.

 

 

 

Let’s take urgent action around speed management to reduce road traffic deaths and injuries.

Did you know by slowing down you can help work towards the Sustainable Development Goals? #SDG3 (Good health & well being) target 3.6; “By 2020, halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents.”

#SlowDown let’s take action

Message on World Poetry Day 2018

UNESCO Director-General’s Message for 2018

Dreams
Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.
Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow.

Langston Hughes

These lines by the poet Langston Hughes are an invitation to a dream, an escape, an emancipation. Poetry is undoubtedly the best form for expressing this yearning, since it touches upon the personal and allows for all freedoms.

This poem is about the extraordinary power of words that open up infinite horizons, enhance our lives, change reality, embellish it, show it in a new light which has never been seen before.

Poetry is not a trivial game of sounds, words and images: it has a creative, transformative power. Continue reading

SG’s message on International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination commemorates the Sharpeville massacre — the horrific killing of 69 people peacefully demonstrating against apartheid in South Africa.

The apartheid regime was based on institutionalized racial discrimination. It was ultimately – and thankfully – consigned to history on the release from prison and accession to the presidency of Nelson Mandela, whose centennial we mark this year.

The memory of Sharpeville lives on in this annual UN observance, when we reaffirm our unequivocal rejection of all forms of racism, xenophobia and intolerance. Sadly, these attitudes persist in countries and among communities around the world.

A stark and tragic example lies in the egregious treatment of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar.

It is time all nations and all people live up to the words of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes the inherent dignity and equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human race. This year marks the 70th anniversary of that landmark document.

We have made considerable progress since it was adopted. People around the world have gained greater freedoms and equality. Conditions of profound economic misery and exploitation have been improved. Women’s rights have advanced, along with the rights of children, victims of racial and religious discrimination, indigenous peoples and persons with disabilities.  Continue reading

UN Secretary-General’s Message on International Women’s Day

 

We are at a pivotal moment for women’s rights. The historical and structural inequalities that have allowed oppression and discrimination to flourish are being exposed like never before. From Latin America to Europe to Asia, on social media, on film sets, on the factory floor and in the streets, women are calling for lasting change and zero tolerance for sexual assault, harassment, and discrimination of all kinds.

Achieving gender equality and empowering women and girls is the unfinished business of our time, and the greatest human rights challenge in our world.

The activism and advocacy of generations of women has borne fruit. There are more girls in school than ever before; more women are doing paid work and in senior roles in the private sector, academia, politics and in international organizations, including the United Nations. Gender equality is enshrined in countless laws, and harmful practices like female genital mutilation and child marriage have been outlawed in many countries.

But serious obstacles remain if we are to address the historic power imbalances that underpin discrimination and exploitation. Continue reading