Category Archives: Secretary General’s Message 2014

THE SECRETARY-GENERAL MESSAGE

HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, 10 December 2014

On Human Rights Day we speak out.

We denounce authorities who deny the rights of any person or group.

We declare that human rights are for all of us, all the time: whoever we are and wherever we are from; no matter our class, our opinions, our sexual orientation.

This is a matter of individual justice, social stability and global progress.

The United Nations protects human rights because that is our proud mission – and because when people enjoy their rights, economies flourish and countries are at peace.

Violations of human rights are more than personal tragedies. They are alarm bells that may warn of a much bigger crisis.

The UN’s Human Rights Up Front initiative aims to heed those alarms. We are rallying in response to violations – before they degenerate into mass atrocities or war crimes.

Everyone can advance the struggle against injustice, intolerance and extremism.

I call on States to honour their obligation to protect human rights every day of the year. I call on people to hold their governments to account. And I call for special protections for the human rights defenders who courageously serve our collective cause.

Let us respond to the cries of the exploited, and uphold the right to human dignity for all.

 

 

 

THE SECRETARY- GENERAL MESSAGE

INTERNATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION DAY, 9 December 2014

            Corruption is a global phenomenon that strikes hardest at the poor, hinders inclusive economic growth and robs essential services of badly needed funds. From cradle to grave, millions are touched by corruption’s shadow.

            On this year’s observance of the International Anti-Corruption Day, we call again on people everywhere to get involved in “Breaking the Corruption Chain”.

            Next year the world will agree a new post-2015 sustainable development agenda. Our aim is to empower individuals and catalyse governments, the private sector and civil society to help lift millions out of poverty, protect the planet and achieve shared prosperity and dignity for all. Eliminating corruption and its harmful impacts will be crucial to our future well-being.

To dismantle corruption’s high walls, I urge every nation to ratify and implement the UN Convention against Corruption. Its ground breaking measures in the areas of prevention, criminalization, international cooperation and asset recovery have made important inroads, but there is much more to do.  Public services must uphold the highest standards of integrity and ensure that appointments are driven by merit. Public servants, as well as elected officials, must be guided by ethics, transparency and accountability.

The private sector also has a crucial role. Good behaviour is good business. Business groups can convert anti-corruption action into firm support for sustainable development.

I call on everyone to help end corruption, and come together for global fairness and equity. The world and its people can no longer afford, nor tolerate, corruption.

 

Bravo to the UN Cares team of Namibia

untitledNamibia received UN Cares 2014 Award for implementing wellness activities for UN employees and families.

The UN Cares Award is a way to recognize the work of UN Cares teams all over the world who work hard to implement the UN Cares 10 Minimum Standards by sharing knowledge with their colleagues, making male and female condoms available in the workplace, promoting staff to know their HIV status, reaching families with information and skill-building, and addressing stigma and discrimination.

1 December 2014 -The United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon thanks all UN Cares teams worldwide for their commitment and congratulates the five winning teams in this short video message. www.uncares.org/UNAIDS2/content/un-cares-award-2014

2014 has been indeed a great year for the UN Namibia.  The UN Country Team has the following to say in recognize excellence in the work of UN Cares team:

“Well deserved congratulations for a job well done. I want to comment the UN cares team for the excellent work being done. Let’s keep up the momentum in the years ahead. You have the full support of UNCT in this – UNRC. I join the “Chief” to congratulate everyone for this well – deserved award – UNFPA. Very proud of you all! – WHO. This is indeed a well-deserved recognition! Congratulations and more grease to your elbows!! United we Stand!!! – FAONA. Bravo to UN CARES team and the cooperation of all staff members who made the activities of UNCARES successful. 2014 has been indeed a great year for the UN Namibia. On behalf of the Staff Associations we commit our continuation to support activities that will bring staff together (Zumba, UNGAMES etc.) Great work!UNDP.”

 

 

 

 

Secretary-General’s Message: Africa Industrialization Day

ban_ki-moon_portrait“INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT: AGRO INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FOR FOOD SECURITY”

New York, 20 November 2014 – Many African economies have shown impressive growth rates in recent years, but increased prosperity has not always translated into inclusive wealth creation. Far too often, economic development depends on the extraction of natural resources and on low-skilled labor, which has resulted in a weak manufacturing base and uneven distribution of wealth.

Agriculture still accounts for the major share of rural household income and employs over 60 percent of Africa’s labor force, particularly women.  Low agricultural productivity continues to threaten food security in Africa as a whole.

I therefore welcome this year’s theme for Africa Industrialization Day: the importance of inclusive and sustainable industrialization and the close links between agro-industrial development and food security.

Africa needs a green, clean industrialization that leapfrogs outdated, polluting processes and platforms and benefits from new technologies. Inclusive and sustainable industrialization is a key stepping stone towards sustained economic growth, food security and poverty eradication in Africa.

On the occasion of Africa Industrialization Day, I reaffirm the commitment of the United Nations to promote Africa’s inclusive and sustainable industrial development to help ensure an economically prosperous and socially integrated continent.

 

 

 

 

 

Namibia Commemorated 69th Anniversary of the founding of the United Nations

Musinga T. Bandora presented framed preamble of the UN Charter to Dr. Theo-Ben Gurirab, Speaker of the National Assembly

Musinga T. Bandora presented framed preamble of the UN Charter to Dr. Theo-Ben Gurirab, Speaker of the National Assembly

On Friday 24 October 2014, the United Nations celebrated its 69th birthday. To commemorate this date the UN staff along with members of the Namibian government, members of the diplomatic corporation, members of the civil society and media celebrated the UN Day in Windhoek at the Safari Court Hotel and Conference Centre.

The event started with a display of the UN’s work in Namibia. Each agency exhibited their work on a local as well as on an international level. The guests received personal insight into the work of the various agencies present in Namibia. It was an ideal opportunity to snatch up the latest publications available including copies of the UN Charter, Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Bill of Rights was also freely available.

The organized event took off in full swing with Ms. Anthea Basson leading the programme as Director of Ceremony. The UN Resident Coordinator, Musinga T. Bandora, addressing audience by placing great emphasis on the work of the UN despites its failures and challenges in a troubled world.

Bandora, highlighted that the UN in Namibia as of last year witnessed many important milestones: the signed and launched the Namibia-UN Partnership Framework-UNPAF- that provides context of our development work in the country from 2014-2018; the UN and the government successfully hosted the historic visit of the UN Secretary General, Mr. Ban Ki-Moon and the inauguration of the UN House; the country also bottomed out of the drought emergency; Namibia served with excellence as Chair of the SADC Organ for Politics, Defense and Security; the country is in the middle of an election process and everything seems to be progressing very well.

On the forefront, the country is also looking forward to the inauguration of the new President and Government of Namibia in March 2015. The country will be celebrating a quarter of a century of independence. The UN will also be celebrating twenty five years of its presence in Namibia an opportunity for joint celebration- of the many solid achievements of Namibia and its partnership with the United Nations.  UN Country Team will consult with Government on the fitting way of celebrating UN@25 in Namibia.

The UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon’s video message was also screened at the occasion, followed by H.E. Selma Ashipala Musavyi, Permanent Secretary, and Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Namibia personal introduction of the Speaker of the National Assembly.  The intimidating presence of the Hon. Dr. Theo Ben Gurirab, Speaker of the National Assembly of Namibia were much appreciated, more so for sharing his personal political reflection. Gurirab underscored his role in the UN and his contribution to Namibia’s independence, but also how Namibia and the UN as a whole can and should work to improve the world.

On behalf of the UN Staff in Namibia a framed preamble of the UN Charter was presented as a gift to Dr. Theo-Ben Guirab by Mr. Bandora.

Throughout the day’s proceedings the staff and invited guests enjoyed performances by the Four Cousins dance group and that of a very well-known Namibian reggae musician, Ras Sheehama. Ras Sheehama first songs “Cassinga” address the battle of the Cassinga Massacre, a controversial South African airborne attack on a South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) refugee camp and military base at the former town of Cassinga, Angola on 4 May 1978. The artist’s second performance tied in well and correspond with the work of the UN’s plea to call and end to poverty.

Secretary General’s Message on the 500 Day Mark to the conclusion of the MDGs

“500 DAYS OF ACTION TO BUILD A BETTER WORLD”

18 August 2011

MDGAction_2014_EN

There are  many fires raging around the world today – political turmoil, bloodshed, public health emergencies and human rights abuses. But there also burns a flame of hope – encouraging progress in the global drive to improve the lives of the  world’s poorest through the Millennium Development Goals.

Adopted by world leaders in the year 2000,the MDGs are an ambitious 15 – year roadmap to fight  poverty, hunger and disease, protect the environment and expand education, basic health and women’s empowerment.

This week marks a milestone on the journey: we are now 500 days from the conclusion of the MDGs.

Quietly yet cumulatively, against the predictions of cynics, the MDGs have helped unite, inspire and transform.

Global poverty has been cut in half. More girls are in school. More families have better access to improved water sources. More mothers are surviving child birth and more children are living healthier lives. We are making huge inroads in fighting malaria, tuberculosis and other killer diseases.

I have met many individuals who owe their survival to this campaign. Yet millions still struggle against extreme poverty and inequality. Too many communities have no proper sanitation. Too many families are still being left behind. And our world faces the clear and present danger of climate change.

Now is the time for MDG Momentum.

The ideas and inspiration of young people will be especially critical in this effort and their role must grow even more. That is why I will mark the 500 – day MDG moment at United Nations Headquarters with education advocate Malala Yousafazi and 500 young people.

Action in four areas can help fuel progress:

First: making strategic investments in health, education, energy and sanitation, with a special focus on empowering women and girls, which boosts results across the board.

Second: focusing on the poorest and most vulnerable countries, communities and social groups that have the toughest road to progress despite their best efforts.

Third: keeping our financial promises. These are difficult budgetary times. But budgets should never be balanced on the backs of society’s weakest individuals.

Fourth: deepening cooperation among governments, civil society, the private sector and other networks around the world that have helped make the MDGs the most successful global anti-poverty push in history.

The challenges are daunting. Yet we have many more tools at our disposal than at the turn of the millennium — from the expanding reach of technology to the growing understanding of what works and what does not.

Action now will save lives, build a solid foundation for sustainable development far beyond 2015 and help lay the groundwork for lasting peace and human dignity.

We have 500 days to accelerate MDG action. Let’s make every day count.

Secretary General’s Message for the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

 

New York, 9 August 2014

 Ban-kimoon

This year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples comes at a critical moment as the world endeavours to meet the Millennium Development Goals, forge a new vision for sustainable development and prepare the groundwork for the adoption of a new legal climate agreement – all by 2015.

 Indigenous peoples have a central interest in these objectives – and can act as powerful agents of progress. In order for them to contribute to our common future, we must secure their rights.

 The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples establishes minimum standards for their survival, dignity, well-being and rights. But huge gaps remain between those ideals and the circumstances facing most of the world’s indigenous peoples.

 While a number of countries have constitutional and legislative frameworks that recognize indigenous peoples, many others do not, leaving their lives and lands exposed to threats. Historical injustices have all too often resulted in exclusion and poverty. Power structures have and continue to create obstacles to indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination. They are among those who tend to face comparatively higher barriers to progress. The negative effects reverberate beyond indigenous communities, affecting societies as a whole.

The interests of the indigenous peoples must be part of the new development agenda in order for it to succeed.

 As we prepare for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in September, I urge all Member States to work in full partnership with indigenous peoples and their representatives to improve their lives and opportunities.

 Together, let us recognize and celebrate the valuable and distinctive identities of indigenous peoples around the world. Let us work even harder to empower them and support their aspirations.

 On this International Day for the World’s Indigenous Peoples, I call on all partners to join the United Nations in promoting and protecting their rights which are essential for our common future.

 

Secretary General’s Message on International Day of Friendship 30 July 2014

SG-BanKi-moon-OfficialPortrait This year’s International Day of Friendship comes at a time of widespread war, violence and mistrust  in many parts of the world. People who have previously lived in harmony find themselves in conflict with their neighbours; people who have no choice but to live together find themselves ever farther apart.

Whatever the cause, and however powerful the forces that drive animosity and armed violence, the human spirit is potentially much stronger. It is our solemn duty to see that it prevails.

In these difficult and unpredictable times, it is vital that we reach out to another in order to prevent conflict and build the long-term foundations of lasting peace.

On this International Day of Friendship, let us remember the ties that bind us together, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation or borders. Let us cultivate solidarity as a single human family on our one and only planet. Let us pursue true and lasting friendship.

Secretary General’s Message on Nelson Mandela Day 2014

ban ki moon

18 July 2014

Last year, the world lost one of its greatest leaders when Nelson Mandela passed away. We remember his legacy especially on his birthday, the 18th of July.

Nelson Mandela and the United Nations had a strong history together. Shortly after he was released from prison, he came to our Headquarters. It was a moment of great excitement.

Nelson Mandela’s presence in the General Assembly Hall proved that United Nations resolutions, sanctions and solidarity can win over violence and injustice. His extraordinary compassion after 27 years in prison showed that human rights and equality are stronger than discrimination and hate. On that day in 1990, he said people would always be challenged by the fact that, quote, “it took as long as it has before all of us stood up to say  enough is enough.” The room burst into applause.

Apartheid is gone – thanks to Nelson Mandela, countless other individuals and the proud actions of the United Nations. But our planet and its people still face terrible threats — poverty, discrimination, climate change, conflict and more. Nelson Mandela Day is a call to action. Each of us can celebrate this Day by helping to address real problems in our communities. Together we can give great meaning o our celebration by paving the way for a better future.

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 A clip of Nelson Mandela at the UN headquarters:

 

Secretary General’s Message on World Population Day 2014

The Secretary General

MESSAGE ON WORLD POPULATION DAY

11 July 2014

ban ki moonThe world today has its largest generation of youth in history – 1.8 billion young people, mostly in developing countries – with enormous potential to help tackle the major challenges facing humanity. But too many are denied their rightful opportunities to get a quality education, find decent work, and participate in the political life of their societies. World Population Day is an opportunity to renew our commitment to help young people unleash progress across society.

Action is urgently needed. Too many young people lack resources they need to lift themselves out of poverty. I am particularly concerned about adolescent girls who may face discrimination, sexual violence, early marriage and unwanted pregnancies. And even among those young people fortunate enough to receive university degrees, many find themselves without employment or stuck in low-wage, dead-end jobs.

The solution lies in investments in health, education, training and employment for young people as they undergo the critical transition to adulthood. This will improve prospects for their lives and our common future.

Young people themselves are speaking out. Earlier this year, more than 1,000 youth organizations endorsed a Global Youth Call, welcomed by 40 countries, which recommends youth-focused goals and targets in the post-2015 development vision.

Next year marks the deadline for reaching the Millennium Development Goals, shaping the successor agenda, and adopting a meaningful legal agreement on climate change. Youth have a major role in all these processes. The year 2015 also marks the 20th anniversary of the World Programme of Action on Youth. Its practical guidelines for national action and international support remain relevant today. In particular, to fully carry out this Programme of Action, governments must respect the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all youth and respond effectively to any violations.

On this World Population Day, I call on all with influence to prioritize youth in development plans, strengthen partnerships with youth-led organizations, and involve young people in all decisions that affect them. By empowering today’s youth, we will lay the groundwork for a more sustainable future for generations to come.